Pediatric Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) work with infants and children to address cognitive communication, expressive and receptive language, articulation and fluency, and social communication.  Pediatric Speech-Language Pathologists also address oral motor and swallowing skills necessary for success with feeding.  They strive to improve functional communication and mealtime success through the use of fun and motivating activities.

View Developmental Checklist

Common areas of therapy

Cognitive communication

Hover to learn more

Cognitive communication

  • Executive Functioning
  • Attention
  • Planning
  • Memory
  • Problem-Solving

Expressive and Receptive Language

Hover to learn more

Expressive and Receptive Language

Expressive Language

  • Articulation; Speech and Sound Production
  • Effective use of words, signs, or pictures to communicate
  • Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Devices

Receptive Language

  • Understand and process information received from others

Articulation and Fluency

Hover to learn more

Articulation and Fluency

  • Lip and tongue coordination
  • Speech and sound Production
  • Continuity of syllables, words, and phrases when joined together
  • Rate, volume, and effort in speech production
  • Stuttering

Social Communication

Hover to learn more

Social Communication

  • Use Language (greeting, informing, requesting, responding)
  • Change Language (using social cues to modify tone, topics, volume, details)
  • Follow Rules of Language (turn-taking, staying on topic, appropriate use of gestures, expressions, and eye contact)
  • Develop appropriate friendships

Oral, Feeding, Swallowing Skills

Hover to learn more

Oral, Feeding, Swallowing Skills

  • Oral motor coordination; drinking and chewing efficiently
  • Swallowing all foods, textures, temperatures effectively
  • Address gagging, choking, drooling
  • Transition from g-tube feeding to oral feeding
  • Create a healthy and fun relationship with food and mealtimes

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Devices

Hover to learn more

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Devices

  • Share ideas and feelings without talking
  • Unaided Systems (gestures, body language, facial expressions, signs)
  • Aided Systems (touching letters or pictures on a computer screen that speaks for you)
Enroll Your Child In Speech Therapy Today
Enroll Now